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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> pporalso comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show
and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live in washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. the u.s. economy is a puzzling thing. today it added 157,000 jobs but the unemployment rate kicked up to 7.9%. also today the dow industrial average closed above 14,000 for the first time in five years, yet the government reported this week that the economy contracted in the fourth quarter of last year for the first time since 2009. so as congress agrees to delay a showdown over the debt ceiling and faces a march 1 deadline for across the board spending cuts, what to make of this darned economy, david? >> am i supposed to answer that? it is confusing. the stock market is up. employers are hiring, very slowly. the government now tells us that hey -- they hired a lot more last year than previously believed. auto seafls are up 14% from last year. housing sales are coming back. on the other hand the economy took a pause at the end of last year? unemployment is very high, 7.9%. among men between 25 and 54 one out of six is not working. so i think when you cu
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. c
funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> is program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house described it as a terrorist attack. th explosion occurred around 1:15 p.m. local time. afterward, police tried to hold back the crowd gathered outside the u.s. facility in the turkish capital. debris littered the street near a side entrance where the blast took place. emergency workers wheeled one of the injured
to receive. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 18
... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: two major airlines announced a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpar
clarkson. >>> a hit british drama downton abbey raked in 1.2 million viewers for its finale. pbs has quadrupled its primetime average. >>> the runner-ups at the oscars will be taking home swag bags valued at $4500. >>> what are they saying? >> well, this is "first look" on msnbc. "way too early" with guest host peter alexander starts right now. ♪ >>> did you see the pictures of president obama playing golf with tiger woods this weekend? neither did we. >> the media covering the president was shut out. the press corps complained. >> there are a lot of holes in the story, specifically, 18 of them. but i believe america deserves to know, who drove the cart? who rode shotgun? did the president play from the woman's tee? fol folks, you're just as upset as i am, i can tell. >> so, it may not be getting any love from the press but the president still coming out on top, tiger woods confirming that the president has some game. this is "way too early." we have a lot to discuss on this wednesday, february 20th. >>> live pictures right now from across the globe, this is outside the south a
for diabetic nerve pain. to hear more of phyllis's story, visit lyrica.com. >>> tonight, pbs will debut the groundbreaking women's stories assembled on video. the makers documentary tells the stories of 160 women who have helped shape america through the women movement, including the 19 1960 protest. >> we did have a sense of humor and we had outrageousness. >> we had a freedom trash can through which we called object of women's oppression, like brooms and dust pans and curlers and high-heeled shoes and girdles. >> joining me a author and activist. what a pleasure to have you both here. >> good to be here. >> a lot of people have called this the birth of the women's movement. >> i know. >> where are we and how has it changed? >> well, we are huge and it's worldwide and it's passionate and sophisticated and it's changed lives in a way that i think sometimes younger women don't fully -- can't fully grasp because we're an ahistoric country here. for example, when i got married, i was a published writer so i used my own name and i was shocked to discover that i couldn't use my driver's lice
that is the kind of republican you have on pbs. >> you cannot say that about paul gigot, the editorial page of "the wall street journal." paul dated from 1993 until 2001. the only reason he left was that he left for new york to run the page. he got the promotion. >> which one of those three did you like the best? >> since then i have been doing it with david brooks -- all three of them have been terrific. i have been very orchard. >> what is the difference in those three conservatives or three whatever they are? >> what is the difference? i do not know. i did it with david brooks longer. coming up on 12 years. to watch david grow from this young firebrand to the walt whitman of his generation -- that has been a fun thing. >> so the greatest journalist in your lifetime -- or that you have ever read or known besides yourself? >> mary mcgrory, the way she wrote, the fact that mary mcgrory was a columnist for "the washington post" -- before that , "the washington star to go a couple things -- she went to the events. she did not just to the thumbsucking, i had lunch with the secretary of state a
-abortion bills and trying to cut nothing but pbs and food stamps and trying to get rid of meals on wheels. to read this speech you would think it came out of the white house. the fact is they're trying to take obama's rhetoric, but it is cutting the exact same policies. they still want to cut food stamps and medicaid. really, they are borrowing barack obama's lines. >> the most cynical, karl rove, i save it admiringly, he is about winning, not about policies, he believes the tax rate should be whatever it is in the tax rate in the campaign. he is getting attacked by the tea party side. he is trying to attack the so-called reasonable republicans against the nuts, rove was just attacking hannity, listen to this. >> the group that went out with the e-mails and fundraising entities, they get into the pocket of the person who owns the website or the political action committee. i am a volunteer, i don't take a dime from crossroads. >> richard, this is the fascinating current civil war in republican world, rove versus the tea party. >> i think he has done pretty well being a political consultant
been trying to defund, since 1994, we've been trying to defund pbs. and you look at the poll. so fox is upside down now, and pbs is the most trusted network in america by a long shot. it really gets no worse for conservatives. this is not our season which, of course, means only one thing, willie. when things look this bad, i swear to god ish , it happened republicans in '64. everyone said they're dad. they come back to win in '66. democrats were dead in '04. remember you said it's the most depressed democrats have ever been. they come back and win big in '06 and '08. >> of course, it forces the hand. >> everything is going so bad. pbs, the most trusted network in news, and this can only mean one thing. a republican landslide in a couple years. i mean, it's just so -- >> it's not funny because in reality, that is the only thing that moves the dime. in desperate times, you know, creates this. you are absolutely right. >> donny, that is a great point. as you go back and you read history and you see what happened, because there's always this back and forth. it takes a gun to the head of
documentary "cliff-hanger" on pbs takes us behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff drama on capitol hill. let's take a look at a clip. >> these guys are going into the meeting with the president. boehner has just been humiliated by his own people with the plan "b" debacle. and he tells harry reid to go [ bleep ] himself. >> harry reid looks up and he says, what? excuse me? and boehner says it again. >> hey, listen. senator reid and i are close friends. we've got to work together. but just like any close friends, sometimes you just need to clear the air. and we did. >> i can't imagine that happening. >> oh, gee. oh, that's never happened on capitol hill before, has it, michael? >> i was talking about between us. that's okay. >> that would never happen. so michael, take us behind the scenes. here i suspect pass is going to be prologged several times in the future. >> well, exactly right. when i look forward to the state of the union address tomorrow night, i'm looking forward to seeing john boehner and joe biden sitting behind barack obama, especially after what i learned in the last six months
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
with me around the table, gwen, of pbs, connecticut governor daniel maloy, jackie collins of the "new york times." when we went into the break, we heard the president say the republicans just aren't working with me on sequestration, the auto budget cuts and we had the republicans saying why won't the president work with us on this? in the end who gets the blame for this? >> this, by the way, is we can't do meat inspection and fly planes and send ships to the gulf. >> right. there's a lot on both your houses. the republicans come into this with the polls in the past and these showdowns which have become so routine, that they've come out the losers on this and they know it. they're at a disadvantage. any time the party that's power is in the congressional wing is at a relative disadvantage of the president of which ever party the president is from -- but the republicans have a record here. the polls have shown in the past they've been blamed more than the president and that's likely to happen here too. i mean if not -- just for the fact that last week they were on vacation all week, democrat
, gwen eiffel of pbs, haley barbour and jackie calmes of "the new york times." so when we went into the break, we heard the president say, the republicans just aren't working with me on the sequestration, the automatic budget cuts. and then we had the republicans saying, why won't the president work with us on this? in the end, who gets blamed for this. >> well -- >> and this, by the way, is, oh, we can't do meat inspection and we can't fly planes and we can't send ships to the gulf. >> right. well, i think there's a lot of attacks on both your houses but the republicans come into this with the polls in the past and these showdowns which have become so routine, that they've come out the losers in this. and they know it. and, you know, they're at a disadvantage. any time the party's power in the congressional wing is in a relative disadvantage to the president to whichever party the president is from. but the republicans have a record here. the polls have shown in the past they've been blamed more than the president. and that's likely to happen here, too. i mean, if not -- just
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
grimm of the "washington post" and cries teen bellantoni, political editor at the pbs "newshour." >> ryan, those response oregon this event are calling the event at the mall largest climate event ever. waiting for crowd counts. not sure if that's going to happen. the main purpose was to put the president on notice about the promises he made during his state of the union speech. how significant is this? >> i think it was a big deal. one of our reporters was down there, and she tells me it was huge, tens and tenses of thousands of people stretching from the washington monument to the white house. >> wow. >> and these are groups who are allied with the white house but are saying, look, enough of this. and they are not just asking for action to -- you know, to make the world a better place, to advance clean technology and grown energy, but they are saying let's stop destroying it also, you know. if obama opens up, you know, the arctic to oil drilling, that will be -- you know, that will be a democratic president doing something that reagan didn't even do, so they don't -- don't want
now. >> big bird goes on to jump and dance, sort of. it will air on 320 pbs stations the first lady will spent the next week traveling to highlight the progress the program has made in the last three years. house democrats are working to keep at attention on republicans refusal to work with the president to stop with the sequester. the dccc is lawn -- launching an ad today talking about what will have. the online video targets tea party republicans in 27 congressional districts. house republicans are intent on moving ahead with their legislative agenda just assuming the sequester will happen, and the spending cuts will stay in place through the end of the year. we'll be back with more show after the break. we'll see you on the other side. stay with us. ♪ going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out.
fatigue, town hall part two, and this week's must-reads. we have political editor of the pbs news hour christina bellantone, robert traynumb, a georgetown university dean, and ed rendell, an nbc news political analyst. hello. nice to see you here. >> hello, there. >> robert, let's go to the blame game fatigue. let's take a listen to the first question that governor bobby jindal was asked on "meet the press" today. >> local air traffic control is on the funding block with this sequestration. and you heard the secretary say this is real disruption because they've got to cut a billion dollars. >> you know, the president, and you heard right, compared the president to lincoln. we need real presidential leadership here. the president needs to stand up to the plate. >> governor jindal's first instinct was just to blame the president, not talk about his state, for example. i mean, why shouldn't the american public be frustrated about this? it seems like it's always pointingpoint ing fingers and nobody taking a mirror and turning it on themselves and saying here's where i can do better. >> you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)